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Hope Sandoval & the Warm Inventions – Until the Hunter

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 Review by Tim Sendra  [-]

Hope Sandoval isn’t the quickest worker, it took Mazzy Star almost 20 years to put out their fourth album, and this record comes seven years after the last one she made with Colm Ó Cíosóig under the Warm Inventions name. Despite the time it took to arrive, Until the Hunter is no great departure for the duo. It features many hushed, lit-by-candlelight ballads, loads of quiet beauty, and Sandoval‘s timelessly beautiful singing. Songs drift by on a wispy cloud of acoustic strumming, lazily twanged slide guitar, and twinkling keys, sometimes gently pushed forward by lightly brushed drums, sometimes left to float along on their own. New to the mix this time is vibraphone, as played by Sandoval, and a couple songs that stretch her horizons just a bit. The duet with Kurt Vile on “Let Me Get There” features the duo getting loose over a slinky Memphis soul groove: Sandoval sounding strangely at home in unfamiliar surroundings, Vile sounding like he wandered in off the street and barely learned the song. It’s too bad he got the gig — there are at least 50 male singers who could have nailed it in his place. The album-opening “Into the Trees” is a very, very slowly unspooling psych folk ballad that doesn’t have much of a tune, but grabs the listener by the throat using its foggy chords, mysterious organ, and Sandoval‘s almost possessed vocals. It lasts for nine minutes, but could have gone on twice as long. The rest of the album is fully up to the standards Sandoval has established over time, with heart-tugging ballads like the very Mazzy Star-sounding “The Peasant” and the lovely “Day Disguise,” languid folk songs (“The Hiking Song,” “A Wonderful Seed”), and even a couple songs of a more sprightly-than-usual nature, the handclap-driven “I Took a Slip” and the almost jaunty “Isn’t it True.” As on previous Warm Inventions records, Sandoval and Ó Cíosóig prove masters of creating atmospheric settings for her luminous vocals. The addition of vibraphone and the slightly more expansive arrangements help make the album a subtle progression from the first two, so do the increased number of catchy songs. The duo have crafted another beautiful album and Sandoval sounds just as bewitching as she did the first time she stepped behind a microphone. Seven years is a long time to wait between albums, but if that’s how long it takes to make the album as good as this is, then the wait was worth it.

 

Hope Sandoval was born June 24, 1966 and grew up in east L.A. with her Mexican-American family. She started her career together with her friend Sylvia Gomez in a band called “Going Home”, a folk duo formed in 1986.

Hope had admired Kendra Smith as a teen-age Dream Syndicate fan. Sylvia Gomez handed Kendra Smith a demo tape which was comprised of Hope Sandoval on vocals and Sylvia on guitar. David Roback offered to produce some recordings for them and they went into the studio and recorded an album that to this day is yet to be released.

Hope and Sylvia played gigs in California throughout the mid ’80s, and stayed friends with both Kendra and David. During the Opal tour in December ’87, Kendra left the band and disappeared. David called Hope to see if she would be interested to take Kendra’s place in Opal. They found Kendra and had some discussions. They did two more shows together but then she flew home. Keith Mitchell flew home and the next day he flew back with Hope. After that tour Opal became Mazzy Star.

Mazzy Star has released 4 albums: She Hangs Brightly (1990), So Tonight That I Might See (1993), Among My Swan (1996), and Seasons Of Your Day (2013).

Hope writes almost all the lyrics for Mazzy Star. Hope is a very shy and private person. “For me recording is better,” says Sandoval. “Live, I just get really nervous. Once you’re onstage, you’re expected to perform. I don’t do that. I always feel awkward about just standing there and not speaking to the audience. It’s difficult for me.”

In 2001, Hope Sandoval and The Warm Inventions released Bavarian Fruit Bread and toured the US and Europe in the fall of 2002. Two EPs were also released: At The Doorway Again and Suzanne.

In addition to Mazzy Star and The Warm Inventions, Hope has collaborated with a variety of artists including The Jesus & Mary Chain, The Chemical Brothers, Death In Vegas, Bert Jansch, Richard X, Air, Vetiver, and Le Volume Courbe. In 2008, Hope had a song, “Wild Roses”, on a compilation CD from Air France titled In The Air.

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Hope Sandoval and The Warm Inventions released Through The Devil Softly on September 29, 2009 and Until the Hunter on November 4, 2016.

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2 Comments

  1. Although Wikipedia and some other sites incorrectly say otherwise, Hope’s early duo “Going Home” formed long before 1986. The duo were creating music together in the early ’80s. Hope said in an interview, that she wrote her first song at age 15 with Going Home partner Sylvia Gomex. It was called “Shane”. This would have been in 1981 or 1982. Hope also said her third Going Home public gig was opening for Sonic Youth and The Minutemen an L.A.’s The Anti Club. Research finds this gig to have occurred Jan. 1985. So, the duo existed long before 1986 and was playing publicly as Going Home by late 1984 or early 1985.

    • Bob I stand corrected and thank you for the info,like so many I do take things on internet as gospel and copy and paste happily away.

      Guess this wasn’t a great start for your visits to TME.fm Radio but it has been a pleasure actually getting a comment and not spam for Belorussian male child brides.

      Maybe we should both use links to source to stop mistakes ‘cos Im taking your word as gospel and not researching.

      Thank you for visiting the site

      Dick

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