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Ben Davis Jr. – Suthernahia, a cracker of an album, Go get yourselves a copy.

 

 

Ben Davis Jr. : Suthernahia
Americana
Release Date : August 16th.

www.BenDavisJr.net
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Hear “Just Let Me In” on Glide Magazine
Hear “I Think You Should” on Southern Sounding
Hear “Line Boat Blues” on Americana Highways


“Davis shows his impressive songwriting chops as he channels troubadours like Todd Snider, David Childers, and Steve Earle. ” – Glide Magazine

“Suthernahia is solid rootsy southern rock’n roll, the kind of album that you’ll want to listen to all the way through  and then you’ll put it on repeat.”
-Melissa Clarke, Americana Highways

 “A hard charging roots rocker with accent on the rock, Davis shows his sure fire pen on a dandy original set that fires up the blood taking looks as various topics that affect the contemporary psyche. Solid modern songwriting that stays on point throughout, here’s a smoking slice of life live from the heartland to you.”
– 
Chris Spector, Midwest Record 


“a noteworthy, memorable release”
– Will Phoenix, HVY

“Ben Davis Jr’s Suthernahia will stay with you long after the record’s over.”
– HR Gertner, Americana Highways

 “one of Americana’s brightest young artists”
– Don Crow, Don and Sheryl’s Music Blog

Born of the hills, hollers, and river valleys of southern Ohio, veteran singer-songwriter Ben Davis Jr’s appropriately-named new album Suthernahia is a dazzling cornucopia of roots based musical styles and heartfelt emotions. Anchored by Davis impeccable song craft and compelling vocals, the collection speaks to the primacy of personal responsibility (“I Think You Should”), enduring relationships (“Just Let Me In”), and honest work (“Line Boat Blues”).


Produced by Eddie Ashworth at The Oxide Shed outside Athens, OH, Suthernahia boasts versatile and full bodied backing by The Revelry (Erik Miller on drums, Levi Westfall on bass, Ben Ervin on guitar, and Ashworth on mandolin and keyboards) and various guest artists, including legendary North Carolina singer-songwriter David Childers (one of Davis’ major musical influences) who contributes vocals and harmonica. Stylistically, one hears elements of alt-country, punk rock, psychedelia, folk, and even 60’s sunshine pop reverberating in the carefully crafted tracks. Suthernahia is an album that rewards repeated listens with layers of meaning and sound uncommon in today’s musical landscape.

1. I Think You Should (4:12)
It starts like a runaway freight train of churning guitars and electric mandolin, with lyrics that call out to those who are going down in a suicide plane to right their course before it’s too late. Unexpectedly, it morphs into a spacey psychedelic jam complete with swirling theremin, mellotron, intertwining guitars, and phased background vocals. Then, at the last minute, the rock roars back for a final chorus to thrillingly close the song.
2. Can’t Get Enough (3:07)
 Davis celebrates his affinity for outlaw country and Bakersfield twang with this cautionary tale of obsessive love gone wrong, then somehow right. Incendiary guitar work and funky Wurlitzer lines complement Davis’ burly, effervescent vocals.
3. If You Ever Will (3:59)
A sweet folky bluegrass tune with high lonesome harmonies, clucking mandolin, and bouncy train beat. Captures that bittersweet tang of yearning for someone and wondering if that feeling is shared.
4. Porchlight (3:44)
Davis excels at capturing the sadness and sorrow of failed romance without becoming maudlin, and there is no better example of his skills than this song. By turns hushed, dramatic, and finally cathartic, the song’s lyrics perfectly capture the forlorn universality of unrequited love.
5. Just Let Me In (5:38)
Using the sound of a gentle rain (captured during one of the album recording sessions) as a segue, this song’s lyrics are traditional in the best possible sense. The line I’ve got a love/like they had way back when resonate over a bed of tape-echoed guitar, stately Wurlitzer, and interlocked bass and drums to create an instant classic ballad.
6. Sunday Morning (2:48)
Davis gets soulfully funky on this uptempo track that evokes the sounds of Motown and Stax records. Boasting a rip snorting baritone sax solo and galloping groove, the song celebrates absent friends and appropriate retribution.
7. Ramblin’ Bones (2:35)
Another folk infused track, with an old-timey feel complemented by fiddle and dobro. 
8. (I’m Doing) Fine Girl (3:03) 
Davis’ fearless songwriting range is on full display with this homage to the sunshine pop and soul of the 60’s. Combining a lighter than air verse melody with period instrumentation (Beatle-esque clavichord, bouncy finger plucked electric guitar, and once again theremin), this track provides a perfect balance to the more intense and introspective songs the album.
9. Line Boat Blues (featuring David Childers) (3:21)
 Davis has always lived on, or very near, the Ohio River, and his familiarity with its vagaries and the people who derive a living from it is evident on this track. Celebrating the folks who work long and hard to navigate the river’s line boats, the song features legendary North Carolina singer-songwriter David Childers on vocals and harmonica.
10. Carly (3:47)
The album closes on a melancholy note with this ode to a lost love whose life ended too soon. The track features Davis on acoustic guitar and voice (in contrast to the rest of the album’s finely wrought arrangements) and is all the more devastating because of it.

All Tracks FCC Clean
Focus Tracks: 1, 5, 9, 10

All songs written by Ben Davis Jr
Produced, recorded, and mixed by Eddie Ashworth
at the Oxide Shed, Coolville Ridge, Athens, OH

Additional recording by Chris Garges
at Old House Studio, Charlotte, NC

Mastered by Jeff Lipton and Maria Rice
at Peerless Mastering, Boston, MA


Photo Credit: Olen Queen

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