Dale Ann Bradley – Dale Ann Bradley

3x IBMA Female Vocalist of the Year and daughter of bluegrass Dale Ann Bradley celebrates her musical heritage with new original tracks, a classic rock cover and a timeless tribute to Bill Monroe.

“I grew up in a tar and paper covered shack right near Loretta Lynn’s childhood home,” reflects Dale Ann Bradley on her rustic origin in the hills of east Kentucky as a hardscrabble preacher’s daughter. ”It was very different. It was not easy,” she says. And even as a girl, she knew she wanted more. With Somewhere South of Crazy (available August 30th), this three-time IBMA Female Vocalist of the Year shares what has shaped her life and music, by going deeper—deeper into bluegrass, deeper into her own musical passions, deeper into her own history as a veteran entertainer who spent years singing country music alongside her ‘grass at Kentucky’s venerable Renfro Valley.

The result is a set that ranges from first-generation bluegrass classics through long-cherished favorites to brand new songs from Bradley and her friends—but always, always with her incomparably rich voice and east Kentucky sensibilities right at the center.

The title track provided Bradley with some especially enjoyable moments.  “We had the best time writing,” she says of writing—and singing—partner Pam Tillis.  “I just love her.  We sat down, and she had that title line and the idea, and I came up with the melody and some lines—we had worked on a few different things, but this was the one that we finished, and as soon as we did, I knew it was going to be the title track.” Bill Monroe’s “In Despair” may be more unexpected.  “I didn’t plan it as a tribute,” Bradley says with a laugh.  “But I hope people will think of it as one.  I just wanted to showcase a more traditional side of what I do.  But I’m glad it’s coming out on his 100th birthday!” The track “Come Home Good Boy” was more intentional and especially poignant, lending itself to Bradley’s first memory of a funeral, when, at age five, a neighbor boy who served with her uncle in Vietnam returned home in a casket.

A smartly selected crew of singers and players frame Bradley’s tender yet muscular singing to perfection. A couple of her regular bandmembers—harmony singer Kim Fox and banjo man Mike Sumner—make appearances, and so do supple, inventive musicians like the Infamous Stringdusters’ Andy Hall, ace studio fiddler Stuart Duncan, bass stalwart Mike Bub, producer Alison Brown (who doubles on guitar and banjo) and, perhaps most surprisingly yet appropriately, young mandolin phenomena Sierra Hull.  All those elements come together in the partnership here with singer, guitarist, songwriter and friend Steve Gulley.  “We grew up together,” Bradley notes. “Steve and me—we each know what the other one’s going to do.”   Yet as strong as the supporting cast is, the focus is, as always, on Dale Ann and the songs she’s chosen—and as always, they’re a deliciously varied bunch.

To a listener unfamiliar with her unique ability to pull songs from the rock vaults and make them her own, Seals & Crofts’ ‘Summer Breeze,’ will undoubtedly be the biggest surprise, but Bradley sees it as a natural.  “I’ve always wanted to do that song,” she says.  “I don’t pick out a rock tune just for the sake of having one—it has to be one that I always grew up with, or one that I hear that strikes me as fitting into the mix.  Sometimes a melody or lyric will just have that feel, just lend itself to the banjo or something like that—like this one, it almost sounds Celtic to me.”

Some songs, like “I Pressed Through The Crowd” and “Will You Visit Me On Sundays,” have been in Bradley’s repertoire for years, yet were never recorded until now.  “I was so tickled when Alison gave the o.k. to ‘Sundays,’” she notes, “because it brings back the traditional country that Steve and I have been singing together for a long, long time.  And of course, ‘I Pressed Through The Crowd’—I’ve been doing that one for a long time, and it just keeps getting more and more meaningful to me.”  Others are more recent.  ‘Leaving Kentucky’ was, ironically enough, started in Nashville, but finished after Bradley moved back to Kentucky.

Artist Biography by Erik Hage

Bluegrass/Americana artist Dale Ann Bradley, who has released albums both as a solo artist and with the New Coon Creek Girls, is known for her distinctive, gentle vocal phrasing and covers of popular (yet non-genre-related) songs by artists such as U2, Gordon Lightfoot, Jim Croce, and Stealers Wheel.

The L&N Don't Stop Here Anymore

She grew up in southeastern Kentucky and has lived in the Bluegrass State for most of her life; her father was a coal miner and Baptist minister. Bradley auditioned unsuccessfully for the New Coon Creek Girls in 1988 and then spent the next couple of years working as a solo artist in Renfro Valley. She finally joined New Coon Creek in 1991 and performed on the group’s 1994 Pinecastle Records debut, The L&N Don’t Stop Here Anymore. Bradley‘s first solo album, East Kentucky Morning, came out in 1997 and largely consisted of compositions by Dale Ann Bradley and New Coon Creek ally Vicki Simmons. The project also featured a celebrated take on U2‘s “I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For,” which helped the album go Top Ten on both the Gavin Americana and Bluegrass Unlimited charts and earn high critical praise.

Old Southern Porches

When the final New Coon Creek Girls album appeared in 1998, “featuring Dale Ann Bradley” was added to the group’s name. Shortly after, the outfit would become Dale Ann Bradley & Coon Creek. Bradley‘s sophomore release, 1999’s Old Southern Porches, featured a cover of Stealers Wheel‘s 1973 hit “Stuck in the Middle with You.” Members of Coon Creek, who by this time featured male players, performed on the album. Bradley put out the solo effort Songs of Praise and Glory in 2001; that same year, signing to Doobie Shea Records, Dale Ann Bradley & Coon Creekreleased Cumberland River Dreams.

Send the Angels

In 2004, Bradley released the gospel-themed album Send the Angels via Mountain Home Records. Bradley next signed with the independent label Compass Records, which would bring out her next three albums — 2006’s Catch Tomorrow, 2009’s Don’t Turn Your Back, and 2011’s Somewhere South of Crazy. In 2007, Bradley was named Female Bluegrass Vocalist of the Year at the International Bluegrass Music Association’s annual awards; she would go on to win the award four more times, in 2008, 2009, 2011, and 2012. Bradley struck a new recording deal in 2015 with the respected bluegrass label Pinecastle Records. Pinecastle would release Pocket Full of Keys in 2015, which went on to be nominated for a Grammy Award as Best Bluegrass Album. In 2017, she returned with an album simply titled Dale Ann Bradley.

Susan Cattaneo – The Hammer and The Heart

In an interesting move, Susan Cattaneo opens both discs on the double CD set ‘The Hammer & The Heart’ with the same song, the carpe diem Word Hard, Love Harder. On the first electric-led disc, The Hammer, she’s backed by The Bottle Rockets for an inevitable guitar ringing rocker. While, on the other, the acoustic-based The Heart, she’s accompanied by folk trio The Boxcar Lillies for a more bluegrassy string version with Jim Henry on dobro and mandolin.

Neither are fully representative of the remaining16 tracks, many of which lean to the bluesier side of the country fence. Back on disc 1, The River Always Wins has a tribal rhythm groove with Mark Erelli on lap steel on a song about the irresistible power of water in full flood as it “comes down from the mountain like judgement from on high.” Co-writer Bill Kirchen joins her on guitar on for a brace of contrasting numbers, the piano boogie In The Grooves with its nod to the rock n roll greats and dreamy piano ballad duet When Love Goes Right.

 

The Bottle Rockets return for the swaggering, amped up Lonely Be My Lover, a similar, but bluesier vibe informing the dobro rooted Does My Ring Burn Your Finger? While sandwiched in-between, she strips it right back for the slow burn southern blues of Dry, a duet with Dennis Brennan.

 

The first disc plays out in equally southern country blues mode with Ten Kinds of Trouble (another song with a lyrical nod to Elvis) and, Davy Knowles and Stu Kimball on guitars, Back Door Slam where, again with a  tribal stomp rhythm, she sounds remarkably like Cher circa Gypsy, Tramps & Thieves.

 

As the title of the second disc suggests, this is a quieter, more reflective side of things, deftly embodied in things like the dreamy Ordinary Magic, a smoky Carriedand the simple aching acoustic Bitter Moon.

 

Elsewhere, Jennifer Kimball provides backing vocals on Smoke’s song about a commitment shy lover (“loving you is like catching smoke”), Everybody Cryin’ Mercyhas a slinky, jazzier gospel groove and co-writer Nancy Beaudette shares vocal duties for the post break-up memories of Fade To Blue.

 

It ends with something of a misfire as, joined by Todd Thibaud, she offers a pointlessly faithful cover of Space Oddity, but any reservations are more than dismissed with the standout Field of Stone. A powerful song about the dangers of hardening your heart, it begins with an image of  small town communities being swept away by “eight rows of asphalt” before giving way to a tale of paternal abandonment and growing up with “my mother’s hands and heartache and my father’s need to run.” Double albums can often be an overindulgence with a surfeit of padding, but, a chance to show two sides to her musical sensibilities, this is well up there with the better ones.

Rhonda Vincent & Daryle Singletary – American Grandstand

Two legends of country music will join forces for one album on July 7th when traditional country artist Daryle Singletary, and the “Queen of Bluegrass” Rhonda Vincent release a duets album called American Grandstandvia Upper Management Music. Along with the album, the duo will also make a round of public performances together.

“I’ve always loved singing with Daryle Singletary,” says Rhonda Vincent. “He’s one of the greatest singers in this generation of country music. It’s so fun to sing with someone who challenges me as a singer. The songs were given great thought, along with one that was totally unexpected. It’s one of the best projects I’ve ever been part of. I am so proud of this recording, and I cannot wait for the world to hear our wonderful creation.”

Vincent and Singletary have collaborated with each other often in the past, both live and in the studio. The songs selected for the duets album range from more obscure tracks, to country music duet classics like “After The Fire Is Gone” and “Louisiana Woman Mississippi Man.” The song “One,” which the duo performed on the Grand Ole Opry at the Ryman in April has been slotted as the album’s first single.

“Rhonda and I have been singing together since my first CD on Giant Records in 1994,” says Daryle Singletary. “I’ve been a fan of Rhonda’s singing before that, but since then for sure and it’s obvious as she has sung on most of my Indie records as a background vocalist or a duet partner. If you love traditional country music, and remember songs originally sung by well-known duet partners like George Jones and Tammy Wynette, Conway Twitty and Loretta Lynn, and Merle Haggard and Bonnie Owens, this is a must-have CD that we are extremely excited about.”

Elliott Brood – Ghost Gardens

Several things spring to mind when one thinks of veteran folk rockers Elliott Brood: steely acoustic guitar strums, banjos and lyrics that address more bygone Canadiana than a Pierre Berton book, with all of those lines sung in a twangy downhome delivery. What we fans of the Ontario alt-country troop don’t expect, however, is for its members to put out tracks like “Searching,” one of the highlights from their new album Ghost Gardens.

The minute-and-a-half song comes second last on this LP, and features distortion and whines akin to synthesizers, all of it evoking a short-circuiting vintage radio. It’s not electronica or overly avant-garde, though; acoustic string plucks are thrown in for good measure, along with samples of a few distraught fellows shouting in the background.

It’s an experimental detour on a mostly downbeat, minimalistic folk album. This isn’t an entirely new, avant-garde foray, though; rather, “Searching,” and the other songs that make up Ghost Gardens, are unearthed demos that the band first started working on a decade and a half ago.

That means many of these songs are quintessential Brood. For instance: quaking mandolin notes and twangy guitar strums abound on closing track “For the Girl,” (which also features evocative lyrics like, “leave me here to blister away in the sun”). “The Widower” is even more traditional, featuring waltz-y guitar and piano notes in the opening moments, followed by echoing vocals, all of it amounting to one of the most gorgeously melancholy tracks of the band’s career. Then there’s the threadbare and forlorn “Adeline,” a winner thanks to its minimal banjo and piano backing. What really puts that track over, though, is its childlike lyrics and delivery, which make it adorably moving. It’s a folk lullaby that’ll tug the heartstrings of fans from any generation.

Don’t worry though: Ghost Gardens is not an overly downcast affair, and its softer numbers are balanced by bawdier tracks like the rockabilly-esque “‘Til the Sun Comes Up Again,” and the sing-along worthy “Dig a Little Hole.” Those peppier songs, along with its quieter moments, make Ghost Gardens a well-rounded release, meaning fans of both Elliott Brood and of folk in general will love every gorgeously crafted second of this new LP. (Paper Bag)

Josh Ritter – Gathering

I was going to write a great review but Popmatters did one for me.

On his ninth full-length studio album, Josh Ritter continues to combine poetic imagery with organic, expertly crafted arrangements.

Label: Pytheas Recordings / Thirty Tigers
US RELEASE DATE: 2017-09-22
AMAZON
ITUNES

In the upper echelon of today’s singer/songwriters, there’s a handful who could be counted among the literary elite — those whose lyrics are poetry that paints unique, evocative pictures — and Josh Ritter has long been considered near the top of that heap. His latest album is, among many other things, an absolute affirmation of this.

Gathering is Ritter’s ninth full-length studio album, coming off the heels of 2015’s Sermon on the Rocks. The songs were largely written in the aftermath of his highly fruitful collaboration with Grateful Dead co-founder Bob Weir (which resulted in Blue Mountain, Weir’s acclaimed 2016 album and his first solo studio album since 1978). The resulting creative explosion, according to Ritter, was a way to cut himself off from the expectations of others. “I began with an exciting sense of dissatisfaction,” Ritter explains in the album’s press release. “What emerged, as I began to find my voice, was a record full of storms.”

The storm-like energy is palpable on Gathering, and the creative spring from where he draws has helped create his finest album since 2010’s So Runs the World Away. Backed by his dependable and ever-present Royal City Band — Zachariah Hickman (bass, acoustic guitar, Wurlitzer), Sam Kassirer (piano, organ, synthesizers, percussion), Josh Kaufman (guitar, synthesizer) and Ray Rizzo (drums, percussion) — Ritter seems positively giddy at unleashing his new compositions with a dynamic energy that flows through both the up-tempo numbers as well as the tender ballads.

Kicking off Gathering is the brief, hymn-like “Shaker Love Song (Leah)”, which opens the album in a stately manner and invites comparisons to the aloof, mysterious arrangements of Fleet Foxes. But it’s soon followed by the first single, “Showboat”, which kicks down the doors with a sunnier, more traditional execution. “Every time it rains it pours / I pray it rains just a little more on me,” Ritter belts out at the song’s beginning before the full band falls into place. The upbeat instrumentation masks the anguish in the lyrics, where Ritter struggles to remain brave and stoic in the face of a breakup. “I’m just a showboat,” he sings. “Won’t catch me crying, no / Won’t catch me showing any hurt.”

Typically, Ritter peppers his folky arrangements with rip-roaring, boom-chicka-boom rave-ups like the infectious “Friendamine”, an upbeat barn-burner that’s sure to bring down the house when Ritter and the Royal City Band hit the road later this year. That same Johnny Cash-like gallop continues, in a more subdued fashion, on “Feels Like Lightning”, which evokes an unvarnished “riding the rails” vibe. “Out across the fields are the thunderheads gathering / Clouds all turned to the color of a cavern,” Ritter sings, pairing his nature-rich, rustic imagery with the album’s underlying “storm” themes.

Comparisons to the aforementioned So Runs the World Away are hard to avoid, not just in the quality of the writing and performing, but in the use of brief, scene-setting tracks like “Shaker Love Song” and the gorgeous instrumental “Interlude”. There’s also a folk-noir feel that pervades Gathering, never more apparent than in the epic “Dreams”. Ritter has been accurately compared to Bob Dylan in both his organic musical approach as well as his inimitable gift for hyper-detailed, surreal storytelling, and on “Dreams”, he delivers in spades. The multiple verses are delivered in a rapid-fire, almost spoken-word style, tempered with the mantra-like chorus of “dreams’ll keep coming but the dream done gone”, over and over, like some Blonde on Blondeouttake. Ritter increases the tension with each consecutive verse as the instruments become more unhinged, dissonant, and nightmarish.

More of this dark atmosphere is present in “Myrna Loy”, a whisper-quiet ballad that combines eloquent verses (“Still every now and then sometimes when the night sky gets so bright / And no Bethlehem of stars could match its burning”) with a simple chorus (“In the darkness / In the darkness”). It’s a beautiful, unrushed gem of a recording – although, at just over seven minutes, I could do without at least one verse.

 

Ritter’s collaboration with Weir spills over into Gathering in the form of “When Will I Be Changed”, a duet with the legendary singer/songwriter. It’s an epic, gospel-flavored ballad infused with rich instrumentation, including wide-open acoustic guitar strumming, soulful horns and vintage organ fills. Weir and Ritter’s vocals are a winning combination — the sturdy legend trading verses with the young folk genius — and is a high point in an album that’s positively stuffed with beautiful moments.

The shift in dynamics between ballads and faster numbers is refreshing and never inappropriately jarring. For every “Myrna Loy”, there’s the careening rush of a song like “Cry Softly”, a rockabilly stomper highlighted by spry guitar leads and a fast, infectious beat. “Cry softly / Real quietly / Your tears are unsightly,” Ritter sings as the band fires on all cylinders behind him.

Josh Ritter’s music is obviously the result of a broad range of influences, which he manages to sprinkle liberally and smartly throughout his work. It’s never derivative and always manages to sound fresh and new. That is a rare gift, and like the artists to whom he’s often compared — Johnny Cash and Bob Dylan being the more obvious ones — his status as a peerless singer/songwriter is unmatched. Gathering proves once again that it’s great to be living in a time when Josh Ritter is making music.

Shannon Slaughter – Never Standing Still

Never Standing Still is the fourth project and second solo effort from the award-winning Shannon Slaughter releasing on Elite Circuit Records on November 15, 2017. Slaughter, a Chris Austin Songwriting Contest Award Winner, contributed 10 original songs written or co-written with industry luminaries such as: Ronnie Bowman, Tim Stafford, Mark “Brink” Brinkman, Dale Felts, Terry Foust and Marla Cannon-Goodman, along with songs by Jake Landers and Roger Rasnake. The well-respected talents of numerous musicians and singers are also showcased on this recording with the talents of: Heather Slaughter, Lou Reid, Shawn Lane, Randy Kohrs, Ron Stewart, Steve Gulley, Ron Inscore, Trevor Watson, Cliff Bailey, Tim Crouch, Doug Jernigan, Josh Shilling, and Tracy Burcham.

More about Shannon Slaughter:
Slaughter is a proud alumnus of numerous leading bluegrass bands counting membership in The Lost & Found, Larry Stephenson Band, Melonie Cannon, Lonesome River Band, Lou Reid & Carolina, and Grasstowne. These bands and bandleaders helped shape the foundation of his band County Clare which he formed in 2010. “Being around leaders like Allen, Dempsey, Larry, Sammy, Lou, and Alan really helped me understand the business side of the music all the while forming the basis for what I would call my sound. They have really been invaluable to my development as a musician and bandleader,” said Slaughter. “I am really proud of the unique sound of County Clare that we have created over the last 7 years.”
In 2012, Slaughter was the 1st Place Winner in the Country division of MerleFest’s Chris Austin Songwriting Contest for his original song, “I’ve Hit Everything In My Life (But My Knees)“ co-written by Dale Felts and Mark Byrd. He has written songs for Blue Highway, Lonesome River Band, IIIrd Tyme Out, Lou Reid, Mike Bentley, Larry Stephenson, and more. In March 2013, Shannon & Heather Slaughter and County Clare release the album One More Road that included 3 radio chart hits including their killer cover of “If I Were A Carpenter.” Shannon & Heather’s follow-up album Never Just A Song, released in February 2015, included their #1 chart radio hit “That’s What’s Good In America Today” co-written by Shannon as well as other chart songs such as “Moonshiner,” “There Ain’t No Need To Be Lonely,” and “Ridin’ The Lightning, Ropin the Storm.”

Alana Henderson New Single Out, Let This Remain

New folk-laden single from Hozier’s long-time cellist available now

 

——————–

In addition to the beautiful instrumentation, Henderson boasts an incredible, lush songwriting talent characteristic of many Irish folk artists. Her vocals are arresting and her bohemian sound haunting. The cello is inventive and subtle, a lilting undercurrent behind soft electronics.(Earmilk)

Alana Henderson is a cellist and singer-songwriter from Co. Tyrone, Northern Ireland.  Her self-released Wax and WaneEP (2014) drew solid comparisons to Joanna Newsome and Fiona Apple. Shortly thereafter she stepped up to accompany Hozier on cello and supporting vocals. Between 2014-2015 she played over 300 headline shows with Hozier’s band, including notable performances at Glastonbury, Saturday Night Live, Jools Holland and the Grammy’s with Annie Lennox. Her new single, “Let This Remain,” is an icy and unforgiving anti-ballad, fusing an electronic undercurrent to her darkly organic indie-folk.

Alana’s mastery of the cello is a highlight of the track, showcasing her dynamic techniques that are looped and overlapped to create a dramatic atmosphere; expertly balancing an arrangement that is both haunting and beautiful.  Written in L.A. near the end of that massive tour, the lyrics reflect on the transient nature of relationships on the road and the emotional detachment that ensues.  When no relationship is expected to last, she jabs, “you could be the one I don’t regret…yet.”

 

“After a period of post-tour decompression it was recorded at a friend’s isolated Irish cottage with the help of Belfast-based musician/producer Alan Haslam and using only the most rudimentary equipment; my cello, a Roland Juno-106 synthesiser and a TR-808 drum machine, along with some improvised acoustic percussion (we snapped a pair of shoe trees together for the snare sound).”

L I S T E N

Alana Henderson – Let This Remain

https://soundcloud.com/alanahenderson/let-this-remain

D I S C O V E R

Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/alanahenderson
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/alanahendersoncello/
Website: https://www.alanahenderson.com/
Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/artist/6P6SqdQjXIzTWKj5QBWliY

DRIFTWOOD’S VIDEO “TOO AFRAID” EXPLORES ATTRACTION’S PLEASURE AND PAIN

 

Recommended If You Like: The Head and the Heart, Lumineers, Fleet Foxes, Vance Joy

… And I’m too afraid to be alone

At its core, attraction is a wondrous thing. How many stimuli have that kind of physical and emotional control over the individual? To be moved so vividly by someone else that your behavior changes in their presence; to feel that strongly about another human being; it’s natural, and yet it often feels totally unnatural. Attraction is as powerful as it is beautiful, an overwhelming sensation that Driftwood capture perfectly in their new song “Too Afraid.”

Oh am I falling for your lies again
Falling for your lies again
But you look so damn good

If I look into your eyes again
Look into your eyes again
Well it feels like going home

Listen: “Too Afraid” – Driftwood

 


City Lights - Driftwood

City Lights – Driftwood

.A song about falling uncontrollably hard for someone else, “Too Afraid” focuses on the fatal attraction experience: “Sometimes there are women that strike your fancy to the point where you lose a bit of yourself,” explains Joe Kollar (vocals/banjo).

It’s also easy to lose oneself in Driftwood’s music. The band pulls upon a pastiche of warm American roots and folk influences, landing somewhere in-between The Head and the Heart and The Lumineers in terms of sound, while offering a fresh, if not timeless perspective on the individual experience through harmonious music and lyrics. The group’s instrumental arrangement – which consists of Dan Forsyth on guitar and vocals, Joe Kollar on banjo and vocals, Claire Byrne on fiddle and vocals, and Joey Arcuri on bass – might be considered ‘traditional,’ but they wield their instruments with polished grace. In a music landscape where electric so frequently replaces acoustic instrumentation, Driftwood’s music provides an anchor to a past that is still very much the present.

Driftwood © Marc Safran

Driftwood © Marc Safran

“Too Afraid” opens with a sweetly seductive interaction between fiddle and bass, where the fiddle plays a hypnotic, repeating arpeggio sequence over punctuated bass hits. The combined effort is light, yet incredibly evocative: In a sense, it’s the perfect backdrop for a personal story. “Oh am I falling for your lies again,” sings Kollar as the verse opens. His words are raw and humble, his demeanor vulnerable as he places this interest over himself. That elevation of another, and the subsequent submission and reduction of oneself, becomes especially resounding in the chorus and second verse:

But I’m too afraid
Yes I’m too afraid to be alone

You talk like you should be my friend
Talk like you should be my friend
So tell me what it is that you want

Oh am I losing all my lines again
I’m losing all my lines again
But you look so fucking good

In his explanation of this song, Kollar notes that “Too Afraid” is, for him, about “the power of a beautiful woman,” but the song is obviously so much more than that. “I’m too afraid to be alone,” he sings. Sometimes we know something is bad for us, but we want it anyway. Loneliness is one of the hardest to cope with – so perhaps that special someone isn’t right for you, but at least it’s something. Rather than explore the intricacies of that mess, Driftwood stick to the surface and leave the diving to the listener.

“I think everyone knows someone (close or distant) that makes them weak in the knees and maybe act differently as a result,” says Kollar. Those who have known love, and perhaps more so those who have known a truly fatalattraction, can easily relate to Driftwood’s lilting melodies and uncertain, scrambling lyrics. It doesn’t matter who you are, or how confident you might appear. Every Samson has his Delilah.

The Earls of Leicester take the Top Honor

THE EARLS OF LEICESTER TAKE THE TOP HONOR OF
“ENTERTAINER OF THE YEAR”
AT THE 2017 IBMA AWARDS SHOW

 

AirPlay Direct is pleased to announce that Rounder Records recording artist, and AirPlay Direct Artist Endorsee Jerry Douglas and The Earls of Leicester took the top honor of “Entertainer of the Year” at the 2017 IBMA Awards Show.  And, it doesn’t stop there.  The incredible voice of the Earls, Shawn Camp, took home the very well deserved “Male Vocalist of the Year” Award.”

Jerry Douglas states, “It’s always a pleasure coming to IBMA’s, and we’re thrilled and honored to win the Entertainer of the Year Award.  Personally, I loved it that so many young people where winning awards last night.  Things are moving in the right direction for bluegrass.”

“It was a true honor to win the Male Vocalist of the year,” says Shawn Camp.  “It was especially humbling to win this award after seeing greats like Hazel & Alice, Roland White, and my favorite fiddle player Bobby Hicks get inducted in to the Bluegrass Hall of Fame.  Without those folks, I don’t know if I’d be here.”

Another highlight of the event was when Earls of Leicester performed alongside Bluegrass 45, a Japanese bluegrass band celebrating their 50th Anniversary. They performed the Flatt & Scruggs classic “Salty Dog”.  The performance was one of the highlights of the evening with energy and comic relief.  It consisted of plenty of bowing to each band and even audience participation with the crowd chanting the Japanese version of a dog bark which is pronounced “wan-wan.”

“We are very proud of the on-going accomplishments and awards granted our Artist Endorsee Jerry Douglas and this incredible group of musicians,” says Lynda Weingartz, CEO – AirPlay Direct.   “I have known Shawn for many years now, and I am never surprised, but always proud of his talent and successes. Congratulations to everyone on The Earls of Leicester team that greatly contributed to the success of the band this year.”

 

About AirPlay Direct:  AirPlay Direct is the premiere digital delivery / distribution company, brand and platform for engaging radio and airplay worldwide.  AirPlay Direct is a professional B2B music business environment for artists, labels, publishing companies, radio promotion firms, PR / Media firms, etc.

 

AirPlay Direct currently has 10,000+ radio station members over 90 countries, and also serves over 42,000 artist / label members globally on a daily basis.  AirPlay Direct currently operates and services the largest global independent radio distribution network in the world with respect to Americana, Bluegrass, Folk, Blues, Alt. Country, Roots Music, etc.  AirPlayDirect.com