Alana Henderson New Single Out, Let This Remain

New folk-laden single from Hozier’s long-time cellist available now

 

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In addition to the beautiful instrumentation, Henderson boasts an incredible, lush songwriting talent characteristic of many Irish folk artists. Her vocals are arresting and her bohemian sound haunting. The cello is inventive and subtle, a lilting undercurrent behind soft electronics.(Earmilk)

Alana Henderson is a cellist and singer-songwriter from Co. Tyrone, Northern Ireland.  Her self-released Wax and WaneEP (2014) drew solid comparisons to Joanna Newsome and Fiona Apple. Shortly thereafter she stepped up to accompany Hozier on cello and supporting vocals. Between 2014-2015 she played over 300 headline shows with Hozier’s band, including notable performances at Glastonbury, Saturday Night Live, Jools Holland and the Grammy’s with Annie Lennox. Her new single, “Let This Remain,” is an icy and unforgiving anti-ballad, fusing an electronic undercurrent to her darkly organic indie-folk.

Alana’s mastery of the cello is a highlight of the track, showcasing her dynamic techniques that are looped and overlapped to create a dramatic atmosphere; expertly balancing an arrangement that is both haunting and beautiful.  Written in L.A. near the end of that massive tour, the lyrics reflect on the transient nature of relationships on the road and the emotional detachment that ensues.  When no relationship is expected to last, she jabs, “you could be the one I don’t regret…yet.”

 

“After a period of post-tour decompression it was recorded at a friend’s isolated Irish cottage with the help of Belfast-based musician/producer Alan Haslam and using only the most rudimentary equipment; my cello, a Roland Juno-106 synthesiser and a TR-808 drum machine, along with some improvised acoustic percussion (we snapped a pair of shoe trees together for the snare sound).”

L I S T E N

Alana Henderson – Let This Remain

https://soundcloud.com/alanahenderson/let-this-remain

D I S C O V E R

Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/alanahenderson
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/alanahendersoncello/
Website: https://www.alanahenderson.com/
Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/artist/6P6SqdQjXIzTWKj5QBWliY

The Early Mays – Chase the Sun


Album Notes
With masterful songwriting and a sweet old-time sound, The Early Mays burst on to the scene with a #2 debut on the National Folk-DJ Charts in 2014. Watertight three part vocals won these women a loyal following in Pennsylvania and West Virginia, and their growth as a band has carried them to the national arena with a 1st place win at the Appalachian String Band Festival in 2016 and a feature performance on NPR’s Mountain Stage in 2017.

On their latest release, signature harmonies are central, but The Early Mays have upped their game with first-rate arrangements grounded in old-time styles. Chase the Sun is a fine collaboration on all fronts with songs that range from traditional to modern in style, and from contemplative to barn raising in spirit.

On “Chase the Sun,” Emily Pinkerton, Ellen Gozion and Rachel Eddy showcase their song and tune-writing talents, as well as the debt they owe to North American musicians who have inspired them.

In the title track, Emily paints a picture of a dry, cracked earth where two people slowly begin to emerge from destructive patterns. Sinuous harmonic progressions, edgy fiddle and clusters of vocal harmonies bring the harsh dreamscape of the lyrics to life.

Little Pink, a beloved old-time song collected by Gerry Milnes, becomes a fiddle tune in the hands of the Mays, built around sweet vocals and stellar banjo by Ellen. Though simple in form, the lyrical and rhythmic detail of the song will have you listening over and over.

Mannington #9 tells the story of one of the worst coal mining disasters in West Virginia history that took place outside of Morgantown where Rachel grew up. It is a such an important part of her repertoire, that when she asked songwriter Keith McManus for permission to record it, he said there was no need to ask because “it was already hers.” The recording features Rachel’s powerful clawhammer style, droning harmonium (a pump organ used in Indian classical music) and solid, stacked vocal harmonies from the group.

The Mays have felt a burning need to share the new sound of the group since Rachel came on board in early 2016. Her strong voice and rock-solid instrumental chops have fused so well with Emily and Ellen’s songwriting and long-time love of traditional music. For Chase The Sun they returned to Broadcast Lane Studios in Pittsburgh to work with Lurch Rudyk (Sarah Harmer,
Kathleen Edwards) and send their songs through his vintage analog gear they’ve come to love.

The Early Mays love the camaraderie of the studio, the road, and rehearsals, and you can feel the gratitude radiate from whatever stage they are on, and from sounds of Chase The Sun.