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Jimmy ‘Duck’ Holmes – Cypress Grove. This weeks TME.fm Radio Review from Jon Hutchinson

No self respecting guitarist would ever admit they can’t play the blues, the chords are pretty simple, all you have to do is play a 1, 4, 5 progression, when you get to the end, put a little ‘turnaround’ piece in there and hey, you’re playing the blues. You’re not, you’re not playing the blues. You never will. You’re not Rembrandt, you’ve got the same paint, it’s the same canvas, the brush is in your hand… yet you still can’t paint a simple flower that makes you stop and stare in wonder.

Blues music was never popular, let’s not kid ourselves. It’s music born of Mid-Western barns and cheap wooden bars in desperate need of repair. All we have left are fading black and white images and crackling records. It was music made by the poor, mostly lives of solitary wandering to find a gig, or if they were lucky, they got themselves a residency for bed, beer, food and some tips. Some did find a little fame, Mississippi John Hurt, Blind Willie Johnson, Robert Johnson were among the few.

Of course, we have Seasick Steve, making blues mainstream, but let’s not kid ourselves that he isn’t a circus act, he’s popular, funny and engaging, there’s a lot to like about the guy and his music, but he plays in the big top. All this talk about a blues revival misses the point, it never went away, it’s always there in the background like a grandfather watching over all of popular music.
There’s a lot of polished, shiny stuff out there, all its minor faults ironed out by people using technology that would shame a space program. At 3:28 on track 2 Joe, there’s a snare beat that’s 3 milliseconds out, so Joe fixes it, after all, they wouldn’t want to offend anyone. Sometimes it seems there is more debate about mixing a track than there is in politics these days.

There are some of us left who like to hear strings buzzing, slightly mistimed finger strokes – to us it’s like a favourite jacket, it certainly isn’t designed by some high flyer, it wasn’t expensive, a lot of people think it looks aged, wrinkled, uncool, but we love it and wearing it makes us feel good.

Jimmy ‘Duck’ Holmes is a blues player, at 72 years of age he’s got a lot of history behind him. What is it about musicians that they never retire? Whilst we yearn for the day we finally walk away from the day job and seek a little peace and escape from everything we worked at for 50 years, these guys never give up, there’s always songs to write, another album they want to record, it must be a glorious yet frustrating life to live. Holmes is no exception, the Blue Front cafe, which his sharecropper mother and father opened in 1948, is run now by him. He opens the club every day and most weekends he’ll be there playing his music, often accompanied by friends. 

 

From the opening guitar run of ‘Hard Times’, all the feel, the imperfection, the century or so of history and culture is brought out into the bright sunshine. Holmes’ latest album ‘Cypress Grove’ doesn’t change anything, it’s not a revolution, but who needs one of those when we can sit in our chair and listen to front porch blues?
The title track is just over two minutes long, but packs in echoes of struggle and the desire for release. Played with such feel and ease, there’s a lifetime distilled down to 128 seconds right here. Holmes then ups the tempo for ‘Catfish Blues’ and ‘Going Away Baby’. Shuffling beat backing electric guitar breaks that overflow with distorted punctuation.

The album was produced by The Black Keys Dan Auerbach in Nashville, and his love of the genre and admiration for the work of Holmes is something that is evident throughout. Auerbach has done great work with this.

Little Red Rooster, that blues standard, receives the full band treatment and it is as laid back as it gets. It’s indulgent, of course it is, and so it should be, played in waves of instruments that wash and ebb over hypnotic beat. ‘Gonna Get Old Someday’ returns to punchy guitar with all the beating blues and sorrowful vocals, it’s full of energy but sung with contradictory world weariness. It’s a great example to anyone of Holmes’ work.

‘Train Train’ predictably uses a shuffle pattern to echo the engine on tracks of steel, and there is nothing wrong with that, the link between trains and the blues is almost as old as the genre itself. The train is running down the track, will it bring his baby back? Who knows… all I know is that I enjoyed the ride through this album, and if you get the chance, buy a ticket for yourself.

© Jon Hutchinson 2019

Sound Arts Recording Studio Incorporates New Music Delivery Mechanism For Artists

Americana Folk artist Courtney Hale-Revia among the first to adopt technology

If CDs are going away what will you sell at your live shows? 

Today’s Artists Read the Tea Leaves

CDs are going away and where does that leave merchandise sales at live performances?  Performances are one of the few places where artists can continue to earn a nice living.  Therefore on site music sales are important and making some profit would be nice too.  Brian Baker, President, Sound Arts Recording Studio has a reputation for embracing technologies of the past and getting cozy with new technologies.  He realized that the industry was making a major shift and his insatiable appetite for all things technology kept his eyes on new developments within the music delivery systems market.  Courtney Hale-Revia is an upcoming forward thinking Americana Folk artist that knew going into the Sound Arts Recording Studio that she wanted to present her music in multi-format options such as vinyl for example.  Her train of thought was and remains let audiences decide on what format they wish to take home.  While Brian’s focus was on the technology Courtney’s was on audience appeal.

Shown: Three choices for show sales: Vinyl, Compact Disc, Credit Card USB
However, a third factor comes into play from a business point of view, profitability. With all of this in mind the two of them began to review options together. One option was this rather new device which is a credit card size delivery mechanism that was priced right and would not only hold audio files but Courtney’s video files and PDFs as well.  This would mean that Courtney could add her new video onto the device along with her bio and audio files.  You could actually have two different credit card size options if you wanted to – one with just the audio files on it and a second with both audio and video files on it. Therefore presenting two consumer price points. The bottom line is that a trusting partnership between the studio and the artist allows for crystal clear examinations of a non-stop evolving industry, the music industry.  In this case it worked beautifully.  If you are an independent artist and your CD sales have declined it’s probably not your music just that less and less people are using CD platforms these days.  Auto manufacturers are not even putting CD players in new cars anymore unless you special order one.  Because you need to protect one of the last bastions of profit, income from your live shows, you definitely need delivery options.  Courtney Hale-Revia is an insightful songwriter and she is quite the entrepreneur.  She comes by it honestly as her father has been a
A Unique Delivery Platform

Courtney Hale-Revia is both a forward thinking artist and venue owner.  To the left you can see how she addressed the reverse side of her new credit card size delivery mechanism.

These storage devices can even be blister packed and include custom made messaging on the perimeter of the container including your logo.

life long folk songwriter and artist for as long as she can remember.  As he has shared the beauty of creation and the enjoyment of sharing with his daughter over the years Courtney could not help but fall in love with the process herself.  However, Courtney has taken her foray into music a step further.  She opened a remote listening room back off the beaten path of interstate 10 just south of Beaumont Texas.  Artists and music lovers alike love it.  Her listening room embraces the intimate experience of being up close and personal.  Sort of like when your Dad or Mom or one of your Uncles or Aunts might have performed at home so many years ago.  There’s just something about these settings that sets the soul free.
Brian Baker of Sound Arts Recording Studio Houston Texas

Alexa Rose – Medicine for Living Reviewed by Jon Hutchinson for TME.fm Radio

 

There is fascination in vulnerability, we are beguiled by a stranger who chooses to share their emotions and history, their short story relationships that turned out to be sometimes painful yet deficient chapters in a novel none of us ever seem to finish. We can be beguiled by the stranger who can create beauty from what seems broken.

Alexa Rose takes a paintbrush from her soul and draws broad strokes across yours. Born in the Alleghany Highlands of West Virginia, there is craft and history here, an awareness of those that went before her, rooted in the traditions of folk and storytelling. Alexa holds these values close and sews together fine threads of quiet mastery and confident clarity, adding her own personality to create a unique style. Alexa holds onto the words as she sings them, not wanting to let them go, wringing all the lasting meaning from them, each one a precious piece of endeavour. Frazey Ford is one of the very few others who can do this so well and to such effect.

The subtlety of the musical arrangements throughout this album is something that you immediately notice, it’s not intrusive, it’s not the centre, not what the song is about, it’s a canvas upon which an artist adds the foreground. The opening song, “Borrow your heart”, shows the promise of what is to come, “Can I borrow your heart, I think I lost my own”, the line is so simple, but hides deeper currents of unresolved thoughts. The thing about Rose is that her lyrics throughout the album can seem contradictory, there is a conflict of thoughts which becomes fascinating. There are times when she writes with such feelings of weakness, confronted with the enormity of love that has taken so much of her but is ultimately fruitless, yet other times when realism and optimism is embraced.

The title track “Medicine for living” is at once haunting and torn, “Can I ask you a question, I know you don’t want to hear, but I’m the heirloom at the mercy of the auctioneer, There’s a crack in the finish, but it’s easy to miss, Are you going to love me when it ain’t like this”. It’s the throes of a relationship that is failing, with all its inevitability and feelings of powerlessness.
“That’s the way love is”. This ballad with its minimalist backing leaves Rose’s voice exposed in all its complexity and range and once again the lyrical quality leaves you in no doubt that this is an artist with depth. The song is a search into perpetual disappointment mixed with eternal optimism.

This is such a promising work, a debut album which deserves all the attention it will no doubt receive, we await more, and what a time we have in store watching Alexa Rose develop her music.

© Jon Hutchinson 2019

 

Rick Faris – Debut Album – Release for Pre-sale

The debut album from Rick FarisBreaking In Lonesome, releases to radio and for fan pre-order in advance of its Nov 15, 2019 commercial release. Containing a bulk of new bluegrass originals, and backed by a cast of talent, this long-awaited project showcases Rick’s depth of musicality and solid footprint in the genre.

Rick Faris has consistently wowed me with his powerful vocals and virtuoso mandolin and guitar playing over the last few years with Special Consensus.  He was playing mandolin when I first saw him and I immediately noticed he is a great singer live–suppose it shouldn’t have surprised anyone when he switched to guitar and was just as proficient and nimble.  His range makes him a natural tenor, but his lead singing is convincing and expressive.  And on top of all this, he’s an outstanding luthier, having built a number of great guitars–including those played on this record.  In short, I thought of the guy as the vanguard of younger musicians who are carrying Bluegrass forward.

But now his solo record shows me that he’s put it all together.  Turns out he’s also a thoughtful songwriter.  He wrote or co-wrote 11 of the 12 songs on Breaking in Lonesomeand they run the gamut from Jimmie Rodgers-style jazzy ditties (“Mississippi Steamboat Blues”), straigh-ahead waltzes (“Wrong Done Right”) to contemporary Bluegrass (“If the Kansas River Can”), cool instrumentals (“Stoneman’s Raid”), blazing fast ‘grass (“Breaking in Lonesome”), a spooky traditional gospel song featuring Shawn Lane’s soulful tenor (“Matthew and Mark’s Wisdom”) and a contemporary Bluegrass gospel song (“Faith in Man”).  The lone cover, Aaron Bibelhouser, Thomm Jutz and Milan Miller’s “How Long,” fits right in.  Most of these finely crafted songs feature the rocking core band of Rick on guitar and lead vocals, Justin Moses on banjo and tenor vocal, Eddie Faris on bass and baritone vocal, Laura Orshaw on fiddle, and Harry Clark on mandolin.  “Never is a Long Time” and the swingy “Honeybabe” feature Special C and make it easy to see why this version of the band has been so decorated.

Bluegrass music might be entering its 9th decade, but Breaking in Lonesome proves it’s more vital than ever, and this project is a perfect showcase for one of its truly bright lights“.
-Tim Stafford (Blue Highway)

Fans can pre-order the album at Dark Shadow RecordingiTunes, and wherever fine music is sold on the internet. Streaming services will begin when the album officially releases on Nov 15, 2019.

About the label:

Dark Shadow Recording is a record label and full-service studio run by a musician for musicians in the Bluegrass, Americana and Folk genres. The small-but-mighty roster has been awarded multiple IBMA awards and is a testament to the DSR’s focus on quality over quantity in music and business. More at www.darkshadowrecording.com.

Libby Koch to Release New Album, Redemption 10 in October

 

Libby Koch : Redemption 10 : Live At Blue Rock
Release Date : October 18th
Americana, Country, Folk
www.LibbyKoch.com 
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Hear “Just The Way” on Americana Highways

 

“In an era of widespread vocal sweetness, Libby Koch has that rare blend of powerful real-life honesty in her vocals that lends instant depth and credibility to her songs.”
– Melissa Clarke, Americana Highways

“Her music makes you want to persevere on the off chance that the new morning might yield an unexpected creation. Such moments may be fleeting, but there are none as rewarding.”
– No Depression

“Koch plays country the way it is meant to be played, with emotion, musicianship, and earthy, clever songwriting.”
– That Music Mag

To celebrate the tenth anniversary of her first album, Redemption, Americana singer-songwriter Libby Koch is releasing a full band, track-for-track reimagining of the original solo acoustic recording. Redemption 10: Live at Blue Rock will be released by Berkalin Records on October 18, 2019.

The format of this record was an experiment for Koch. Recording her 2016 album Just Move On on Music Row in Nashville hooked Libby on the energy of making a record with a band playing the songs together, recording live in the studio. She wondered what it might be like to add a live studio audience to the equation – to let fans be part of the experience as well. Koch found the perfect location for this endeavor at Blue Rock Artist Ranch and Studio in Wimberley, Texas. Blue Rock is a state of the art studio and performance space in the Texas Hill Country that has the capability to film and broadcast live performances while providing an intimate experience for the audience and capturing pristine audio of the performance.

With the location set, Libby enlisted her friend Patterson Barrett (Buddy Miller, Jerry Jeff Walker, Nanci Griffith) to co-produce the project and assemble an all-star band of Austin musicians to record Redemption 10 in front of a live studio audience at Blue Rock. Tickets quickly sold out. Libby and the band played the album straight through once and then played a second take of a couple of songs, but in the end they decided that the flow and the feeling of the first takes were the ones that needed to be on the record. It was a magical evening.

While not a traditional live album, the atmosphere and the feedback from the crowd absolutely fed the band and shaped the experience that was caught on tape. Koch and her band sound relaxed and in an energized zone that only a live setting can provide, but at the same time they have the tight knit sound of an experienced studio band. In the end the experiment was a resounding success. The record shows a Libby Koch that her fans have loved for a decade now and presented these tracks in a fuller more realized way. If Redemption 10 is your introduction to Koch, you are in for major musical treat.

The band of Austin all-stars included lead guitarist Bill Browder (Denim, Steve Fromholz), drummer Eddie Cantu (Bruce Robison, Maren Morris), violinist Javier Chaparro (Austin Symphony, John Denver), and Glenn Schuetz (Jimmy LaFave). Libby played acoustic guitar, harmonica, and sang lead vocals, while Patterson Barrett rounded out the sound of the record by providing pedal steel, piano, organ, mandolin, and harmony vocals.

When asked about the inspiration behind the project Koch says:

“Ten years ago, when I recorded Redemption, I was a young attorney at a big law firm in Houston. At the time, I thought this was probably the only record I would ever make, and I certainly didn’t anticipate I would ever have a career in music. Once I self-released the album and started playing shows and selling copies of the CD in Houston, one thing led to another, and before I knew it, I was building a career in music! Ten years later, I’ve put out a few more records (Redemption 10 will be the sixth), and I’ve played hundreds of shows across the US and Europe. It’s been an incredible adventure, and I’m most thankful for all the great friendships I’ve made with musicians and music lovers across the globe. Revisiting my first album feels like a fun and fitting celebration of the music and memories I’ve made over the past decade.”

 

Songs:

1. Houston: I wrote this song the day after I graduated from law school in Nashville. The movers had come and gone, and the house was empty. I was leaving for my new job and new life in Houston the following morning, but before I left, this song had to be written. At the time, I thought I was saying goodbye to a guy, but upon reflection I now see that I was closing one chapter and starting another.

2. Just the Way: This song is about the somewhat cyclical nature of “dating” (I don’t think the kids call it that anymore). It was written in a time when I was perpetually single and not particularly good at keeping it casual! This has been one of the most fun songs from Redemption to revamp and play live, both for the band and the folks on the dance floor.

3. Can’t Complain: Writing this song was an attempt to gain a little perspective after a breakup and remind myself that, at the end of the day, I was going to be okay. In true Texas style, I was raised to dust myself off and get back on the horse after you fall out of the saddle, and this song is part of that tradition.

4. Stay With Me: I wrote this song in law school. When I played it for my roommate, she said “oh my god, that’s the saddest song I’ve ever heard.” Little did she know, I was just getting started!

5. Redemption: One of the most interesting elements of this project has been revisiting the songs to see if they’ve changed, I’ve changed, or both! This is one of the songs that has grown in meaning and depth for me, as it was written for someone who I now know never really loved me back. Now I sing it for someone who really deserves these words.

6. How Long: This record definitely intertwines spiritual themes into love songs…How Long is a great example of that. I based this song on the text of Psalm 40, with lines of each verse and the chorus tracking the Psalm: “I waited patiently for the Lord, and he turned to me and heard my cry. He brought me up out of a slimy pit, out of the miry clay, and set my feet upon a rock, and gave me a firm place to stand”

7. Down: This is probably the song that changed the most from the original version. I always heard this song in my head as a honky tonk number, but Patterson said “what if we make it a rocker?” Once the band kicked into gear on this groove it was clear that it was meant to be. We had THE most fun with this song!

8. Don’t Give Up On Me: This is a spiritual song that I wrote in high school. I got my start playing guitar in my church’s youth group and the Young Life band, so a lot of my early songs were written from a spiritual angle. At such a young age it was easier for me to write those spiritual songs than it was to write something personal about someone else…I was so afraid people would figure out the songs were about them!

9. Ready Now: This is another song I wrote when I was young that started out as a spiritual song, but ended up being a love song. It’s also one of the songs that has changed for me in the past decade since I recorded the original version. Now I see this song as a readiness to dive in headfirst to life and love to see what happens (spoiler: good things usually happen when you do that).

10. I Still Miss Someone: I decided to close the album with one of my favorite Johnny Cash songs, I Still Miss Someone. The original Redemption version was just me, my harmonica, and my guitar…a really intimate version of the song. This live version ended up being a little more lively and faster than we anticipated, but I think we were all having such a great time and in a nice groove that it turned out the way it did. I love both versions and am so happy with how this entire project turned out.

 

www.BrokenJukeboxMedia.com
[email protected] 

Full length debut album from East Nashville resident, Nick Nace. Wrestling With The Mystery will release officially on October 25th.

Dust of Daylight premiered the first single, “Fly In A Bottle” last week. The record was produced by Jon Latham and is being released by Flour Sack Cape Records. Below is more info on Nick and the album, downloads and a private stream. A select number of hard copies will go in the mail soon, so if you’d like one please let me know. Nick is available for interviews upon request as well. Thank you all for everything you do.

Hear “Fly In A Bottle” on Dust of Daylight

“Nick Nace’s songs pair well with a good, long drive. Each one moves just at the right speed, poetically painting scenes of all those characters you meet out on the road — and all those thoughts you think alone behind the wheel. He’s not just a songwriter’s songwriter, he’s a troubadour’s troubadour.”
– Jaimee Harris (Songwriter)

“I love Nick’s writing style, reminds me of John Prine but with it’s own character also, check him out!”
– Mick Flannery (Songwriter)

Nick Nace’s path from Canada to New York City to Nashville has been one filled with music, but the acclaimed folk singer-songwriter admits his muse led him in a different direction throughout his younger days than it does presently. Even though he was raised on a steady diet of Queen, The Band, the Beatles and even Beck, it was the bite of the acting bug that led him to relocate from the Great White North to the Great White Way.

“I always loved music, but I was a drama kid,” he admits. Fresh out of high school in the late ’90s Nace moved to New York City to pursue acting, and it was then his musical urges began taking a greater hold of his spirit than ever before. He bought a cheap, blue guitar and found himself playing in student housing halls more frequently as the months passed. He was attending acting school, but that cheap guitar was guiding him towards the tunes.

“I loved acting school,” he remembers. “But I could feel this pull to the guitar and songs that I had never felt for drama. Then I heard Bob Dylan’s first record and my mind was blown. The rawness and energy floored me. I was hooked. then my friend played me some Velvet Underground and I couldn’t stop listening. It had soul, it had honesty. After that, I pretty much stopped acting.”

“Why would I be a conduit for someone else’s words when I could write my own,” Nace asked himself during that college-aged musical enlightening.

Soon after forming his first folk duo, A Brief View of the Hudson, with a friend from acting school, Nace found himself with prime weekly gigs, and eventually recording an EP and an LP with the duo. And for a while, that was enough. But the urge to grow as a songwriter and to tell new stories in new ways led him to discover that the Big Apple wasn’t where he needed to be in order to move ahead.

Nace has come a very long way since moving into an East Nashville basement apartment, sight unseen, in December of 2015. He discovered a community of talented, like minded writers and musicians and began working with them. He’s toured Ireland, Canada and throughout the United States, including prized slots at the Mississippi Songwriters Festival, Dripping Springs Songwriter Festival and even won the Gulf Coast Songwriter Shootout.

Wrestling With the Mystery, Nace’s latest full-length effort, is as open-hearted and sincere as it is addictively catchy and melodic, recalling the fine country-folk efforts of Hayes Carll, Justin Townes Earle, Slaid Cleaves and James McMurtry. Recorded with producer John Latham, who also provided guitar and vocals to the record, at Nashville’s Cafe Rooster, the album features stories that are intimately, even painfully, personal, touching and tragic.

The stunning Fly in a Bottle, looks into the sort of regrets we all have, though few of us ever admit to. It’s a great example of how Nace can turn something dark into something shining.

“At the time I wrote this my ex-wife was in a fairly bad and abusive relationship and it was very painful to watch her go through something that. It was very hard to understand. It made me think if perhaps I’d been a better partner she wouldn’t have ever put herself in that horrible situation in the first place.”

Inspired by a chance encounter one day after attending Easter church services in Mississippi, “Clarksdale Katie,” is the sort of out-of-nowhere tale that grabs the listener with a force that doesn’t let go until the track changes. Artists like Nace have a gift for taking each day’s interactions and chronicling them in ways most of us can’t fathom.

“I ended up meeting and sitting beside a nice young woman named Katie. After the service we were hanging out at a local watering hole and she was very worried about not hearing from this friend of hers. So, we drove over to the friends and knocked on the door but no one answered. Later in the day Katie disappears for some time. It turns out she had a bad feeling and went back to her friends place only to find her in bed half unconscious having swallowed a bottle of pills. Somehow, she gets inside, calls an ambulance and saves her friend’s life.”

When he sings, “I’ve given up on love, burned your wedding gown, given up on concrete, and riding underground” in album-opening “One More Song” he’s looking into the dissolution of not only a romantic, real-life relationship, but at his break-up with New York City, the place he thought he would live out his days living a different sort of dream.

To close out the record, Nace offers perhaps his most personal story. In a confessional, storyteller’s way that Guy Clark would be proud to hear, Nace sings about “Grandpa’s Old Guitar.”

“It’s the true story of my Grandpa’s old Gibson guitar he bought for $50 after getting back from WWII,”he says. “He loved to play guitar and sing old folk and country songs. He would play it at family picnics and gatherings, and towards the end of his life he offered to pass the guitar down to me. But the day I went by his place to get it he wasn’t home. Two weeks later he went into the hospital and never came out. My grandmother eventually gave it to me but I never got a chance to have that moment with my grandpa and I’ll always regret not making it back over there before he passed away.”

From Ontario to the Big Apple to Music City, Nick Nace has moved in order to experience, to grow. But through it all he’s continued to craft stunning song after stunning song based upon the people, conversations, trials and triumphs of the path that only he has traveled, and only he can share.
Nick Nace : Wrestling With The Mystery 
Release Date: October 25th
Americana : Folk
www.NickNace.com 
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Chris Gardner’s “Hangin’ On The Line” Moves Into The Top Ten On Roots Americana Chart

Houston Tx (September 17 2019) – Chris Gardner’s “Hangin’ On The Line” album continues to rise on the charts.  Now in its 15th week the eleven song compilation finds the top ten by rising to number 9 on Roots Music Report’s Americana chart.  (see above)  When asked for a remark on how it feels Chris had this to say, “I wrote these songs and then began working with Andy Bradley at Wire Road Studios. Andy surrounded me with world class session musicians and as we progressed through the recordings we realized we might have something rather special.  Once it was mixed completed it was ready for Bill Wence to release it to the stations.  Talk about being excited and anxious all at one time.  Then it began to rise up the charts while John in Houston was continuing to let the stations and the publications know it was out there.  Now to think that “Hangin’ On The Line” is in the top ten with Rodney Crowell, Chris Stapleton, and the other greats in that category well that is just something else.”   “Hangin’ On The Line” Musicians include: On piano Paul English, bass Rankin Peters, Drums Tyson Sheth, Guitar Wayne Turner, Guitar David Gellego, On steel Brian Thomas, fiddle Hilary Sloan, background vocals Tommie Lee Bradley.
KPFT Show hosts invite
Chris to share his story
Chris visits with KPFT’s Tom Tranchilla and co-host Eric of The Songwriter’s Studio. The ever popular Tom Tranchilla show is the listener’s choice on late Sunday afternoons in southeast Texas. The mic was hot, the stories interesting, and the humor poured across the air waves.  “These are two great guys, great questions and we did indeed have fun.”
– Chris
Videographer Tan Truong (West Side Recording) Shoots
Complete Video Music Library of “Hangin’ On The Line” 
The audio recording sessions were over and Chris wanted to do something a little bit different with the release of his new upcoming album “Hangin’ On The Line”.  So he decided to call professional videographer Tan Truong and inquire about the possibility of shooting a complete album from beginning to end in front of a live studio audience.  Tan liked the idea, added some thought to the project, and a date was set to shoot it at Wire Road Studios in Houston.  There on a Sunday afternoon with Andy Bradley at the helm the musicians came in, tuned up, and then something really cool was about to take place.  It was decided that the video would be shot without stopping.  All eleven songs would be shot just in the order as they are on the album in front of the live audience.  The countdown began and these masters of recording sessions were absolutely flawless.  From the beginning to the end it came down just like the old days of analog sessions.  You go for it in one take.  Now Chris is releasing one track at a time and soon the complete audio collection of “Hangin’ On The Line” will be a music video collection as well.  Below is the second track from the album, just released this week.
From Hanks
Americana Radio

“Chris Gardner from Houston Texas
is a great Americana singer. So be looking for Chris’s new album on Hank’s Americana Radio” – Hank

Just click on the arrow below to see the live action that took place at Wire Road
Chris Joins Music Talk Show Host Allen Weissman in Chicago Illinois on
“In A Nutshell

Shot at Comcast Studios last month and due to be streamed to over a million viewers later this month the shoot was something else.  Show host Allen Weissman shares, “Chris is a true gentleman my wife and I enjoyed both the green room and on set  visits.”

JEREMY IVEY releases debut album The Dream And The Dreamer via ANTI- Records

Listen to the title track HERE

Photo credit: Cal & Aly

“Modern, indie, super-cool sounds abound in ‘The Dream & The Dreamer’, produced by Price.” – NPR Music

“Ivey cooks up a gentle country rhythm featuring fingerstyle acoustic guitar, woozy Dobro licks, and electric guitar accents, evoking Mutations-era Beck” – Rolling Stone

“Margo Price captures her husband’s vibe perfectly, keeping the sound open, airy and enticing. And who better to help steer Ivey’s first solo set than the person who knows him best?” – American Songwriter

“There is a substantial portion of [Nashville]’s underground that’s enamored more with Warren Zevon than, say, George Jones. I can see that in Ivey, but I see a whole lot more. His music is grounded in the best the ’70s had to offer, introspective country-rock with a dash of psychedelia that he first explored in the band Buffalo Clover.” – No Depression

Nashville-based storyteller Jeremy Ivey has released his debut album The Dream and the Dreamer today; Listen to the title track HERE. Ivey has operated in the background for years, initially performing in bands like Secret Handshake and country-soul group Buffalo Clover with his wife, celebrated country-rock luminary Margo Price. But now, at 40, Ivey is ready to take a much-deserved step into the spotlight. Ivey recently sat down with Rolling Stone to chat about his early 40’s ambitions, being adopted and recently listening to Springsteen’s Greetings From Asbury Park, N.J. for the first time. Read that interview HERE.

“I want to prove that you can be in your 40s and be at the peak of your creativity,” he says. “Not a has-been, but as an ‘is-being.’” Recorded in a “little bitty house studio” in Nashville and produced by Price, the nine-song album hosts a collection of homespun, deeply introspective tracks. Ivey, who writes prolifically and ideally wants to release an album a year, cites everyone from the Beatles to Neil Young, Leonard Cohen, and Bob Dylan as influences.

“I wrote The Dream and the Dreamer in my sleep,” comments Ivey. “[Margo and I] were in Mexico. We both passed out kind of early and I woke up in the night and I had this dream about these two characters. One of them was a glowing green ball and the other one was a figure. The dream is a green ball and a figure was the dreamer… And then it turned out that it was a story is about America, and that the dream was the American dream. The dreamer was the exodus from England to find a new place.”

Meanwhile, Ivey is invested in his own version of the American Dream—specifically, offering up a melting pot of genres, ideas, and stories. “The best thing I could say is that I’m trying to fill the holes that I can see in the scene,” he says. “Whether it be Americana or country or rock or whatever. There’s a certain type of song that isn’t being written.”

Order ‘The Dream and the Dreamer’ HERE

JEREMY IVEY: Website | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

Coming Soon! The Hackles • A Dobritch Did As A Dobritch Should on November 8, 2019

The duo’s propensity for glowing chords shines on their upcoming record, though it soon becomes apparent that the expert delicacy of the couple’s guitar work only barely contains the graceful, mounting power prevalent in the meeting of Claborn and Ydstie’s voices.

“We’re processing a lot of things going on in our world right now,” reflects Kati Claborn during a respite from touring. Along with her partner Luke Ydstie, Claborn is striving to make sense of the present by looking to the past in The Hackles’ upcoming album, A Dobtrich Did As A Dobritch Should, out on Jealous Butcher Records on November 8, 2019. “We’re looking at the big picture through individual lives,” says Claborn.  In an era rife with discord, The Hackles are using melodic, shimmering indie folk to chronicle means of control and autonomy through idiosyncratic narratives.

 

Ydstie and Claborn first met in Portland in the mid-2000s after Israel Nebeker and Ryan Dobrowski of Blind Pilot recruited additional band members to flesh out the band. Still members of Blind Pilot today, Ydstie and Claborn first met at these initial band practices, and now live in Astoria, Oregon with their five-year-old daughter. After discovering how well each of their creative processes’ enrich one another’s, Ydstie and Claborn decided to form their own musical project. “I think one of the reasons why it’s so successful when Luke and I write together is that we feel very safe and open,” says Claborn. “Both of us feel like we can throw out any idea and it’s okay. We can try anything.” Co-producer Adam Selzer expands this environment of experimentation. “Going into the mixing process, we gave Adam free reign to do whatever he wanted, and he made a lot of interesting mixing choices and added effects that had a huge effect on how the album turned out.”

Though The Hackles’ upcoming record title might at first seem imbued in mystery, the  eccentric name is a nod to the life and death of 20th century Bulgarian circus impresario, Al Dobritch, who appears most markedly in “And The Show Goes On.” The chief producer of famed Circus Circus Casino in Las Vegas, Dobritch made a name for himself after escaping World War II and settling in America, eventually rubbing elbows with celebrities and marrying film star Rusty Allen. His gilded life came to a dark end when he was charged with kidnapping and, soon after, jumped to his death on the Las Vegas strip. “Dobritch went through so many crazy things in his life,” says Claborn, “And though he was able to persevere and create this incredible life, it goes to show that at the end, there are sometimes things you can’t control.”

The interwoven notions of predestined fate, as well as the hopeful antithesis of regaining power over one’s personal circumstances, stream throughout The Hackles’ upcoming release, complemented by the album’s serene sound. The duo’s propensity for glowing chords shines, though it soon becomes apparent that the expert delicacy of the couple’s guitar work only barely contains the graceful, mounting power prevalent in the meeting of Claborn and Ydstie’s voices. Similar to the tug-of-war stories that Claborn and Ydstie portray, the dynamism of the duo’s vocals never overpowers the tranquility of the chords below. Instead, both strengths support and enhance one another. “There’s a thread going through the album about the things that control us in our lives and the things that we’re able to take back,” surmises Claborn, “It’s about the impact of inevitability, the webs you can weave, and the webs that weave you.”

Cornell Kinderknecht Timeless sound for a contemporary world… Dreamtime.

The flowing melodies and subtle harmonies of Cornell Kinderknecht’s flutes, reeds and keyboards blend with the moving rhythms of Martin McCall’s drums and percussion to take you to a place where all things are possible – a place where you can be at peace while feeling energized – a place of mystique and wonder – a place of fantasy where you can play and let your imagination run free…

Label: Little Greyhound Music Catalog #: AMUS-0104

Release date: November 2013

Genres: Instrumental, World Fusion, New Age, Ambient

Together, Cornell and Martin create a collection of instrumental music that is equally poignant as it is bold. It’s the perfect music for listening while at the same time, you can zone out and chill with it, get up and move with it, or let it accompany you on a long road trip. Whether it be the grounding earthy songs like Gecko, the mind-opening vastness of Big Sky, the astral exploration of Orion and Voyager, or the quiet longing of One Summer, each song on this work has the power to engage on multiple levels. World flutes and winds virtuoso Cornell Kinderknecht is an award-winning recording artist, composer and performer whose music touches the heart and feeds the soul. He is a winner in the Instrumental category of the Great American Song Contest and has twice been nominated as Texas Music Awards “Musician of the Year” for his solo recordings. His work can be heard in film, television and advertising as well as on numerous other artists’ albums in multiple genres. Martin McCall is a veteran drummer and percussionist and past winner of the Carmine Appice Drum Solo Contest and named a Texas Tornado by Buddy Magazine. Cornell and Martin’s synergistic collaboration provides the perfect roadmap to that special place where all things truly are possible.

“The album is an elegant exploration of melodic soundscapes which convey warmth, contemplation and an innate healing spirit.” – Candice Michelle, Journeyscapes Radio

“I heartily recommend this work for those who want their music to provide them with relief from stress and the modern world, and who seek some quiet time for introspection, and, of course, Dreamtime.” – Rick McDaniel, Independent Reviewer

“Dreamtime is bright and groove inducing, perfect for work and a delight for pure listening enjoyment…” – Amy Martin, Moonlady Media

Cornell Kinderknecht Timeless sound for a contemporary world…
Music that can move the heart, take you on an exhilarating ride and then set you down gently and sweetly right where you need to be. Cornell’s instrumental music has that power to let you lose yourself in bliss with its melodies, tone colors and beauty. Allow yourself to take that ride. You’ll be glad you did.
Cornell Kinderknecht is an award-winning world flutes and reeds virtuoso, pianist and keyboardist. His world flute and reed instruments include Native American flute, bansuri, ocarina, whistle, recorder and saxophone, among others. He is an Indian Summer Music Awards winner, a Top 5 Winner in the Great American Song Contest instrumental category, and has twice been a finalist for Musician of the Year at the Texas Music Awards. Venues Cornell has performed include the prestigious Carnegie Hall, the magnificent amphitheater built into the 2000-foot red rock cliffs of Zion Canyon, the underground “Cave Without A Name,” the Meyerson Symphony Center, and the AT&T Dallas Cowboys Stadium. His music can be heard in film, television series and advertising. In addition to his own recordings, Cornell’s playing can be heard on numerous artists’ CDs in multiple genres. He is in high demand as a performer at festivals around the US.
Cornell‘s original compositions and playing have been described as soothing, soaring, haunting, and playful with influences of Native America, the Middle East, India, and the Far East. His style, which draws from his experience in world, Classical, folk and pop, brings a new and fresh flavor to the instrumental and new age genres.